West of England Joint Spatial Plan: Towards the Emerging Spatial Strategy

Joint Spatial Plan: Emerging Spatial Strategy

Responses

List of answers to the specified question
NameOptionTextDate
Mr. and Mrs. Sperring C/O Alde… See attached. 19 Dec 2016 22:49
South West Strategic Developme… See separate Representations Document. 19 Dec 2016 17:54
A. D. G. Pearson The Joint Spatial Strategy is a misrepresentation of options available. It makes no mention of the proposed Ashton Vale development which would be, by far, a more suitable reasonable alternative:

• it is situated next to Bristol where most people work and study;
• transport infrastructure is either already in place or has provision made to meet transport needs (it has a new South Bristol link road already built; there would be access to the new Metro Bus service; there is potential for a new train station on the Weston to Bristol line; the planning application includes proposals for a new park and ride and extensive cycle routes into Bristol);
• proposals include a new college, three new primary schools and a new secondary school to support associated population increase;
• proposals include space for GP and dental practices;
• it is at a mature stage of planning and deliverable within the timescales needed. In contrast, North Somerset Council would struggle to deliver 5,400 homes in the Mendip Vale by 2036 (see comments to Question 5) and, in the meantime, the rural towns and villages of North Somerset would remain extremely vulnerable to more piecemeal planning applications and gradual erosion of our social and environmental communities. This could be avoided if the significant number of houses offered by Ashton Vale developers could be delivered much sooner.

I acknowledge that the proposed Ashton Vale site is within current green belt (although we understand this is the subject of a North Somerset Council review committee). However, this particular area of green belt already includes major roads, large areas of land fill, and a golf course; it also comprises just 1.9% of all green belt land in North Somerset. Adjoining green belt also already has Bristol Airport in it. In contrast, Mendip Vale is all green field adjoining the Mendip Hills Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. Mendip Vale offers a superb opportunity to become an alternative designated green belt in synergy with this AONB and, rather than being a site for urbanisation could become designated as green belt to replace the area carved out of existing green belt for the more suitable Ashton Vale solution.

I completely disagree with the proposals for developing a new town in the Mendip Vale as detailed in the Joint Spacial Plan.
17 Jan 2017 14:26
A. J. and G. G. Thomas - The Strategy is not based upon a robust assessment of sustainable locations and is not seeking to redress the balance of Strategic Housing Locations and employment.

- The opportunity is to direct development to sustainable locations such as locations defined in the JTS as being focused on urban locations, peripherals towns and service villages to the Bristol Fringe. Areas that have already seen the benefit of employment area designations, potential MetroBus improvements, road widening etc.

- The most appropriate Strategy to build on previous successes would include releasing sustainable sites from the Green Belt in locations that improve the performance of settlements.
24 Jan 2017 16:45
A. M. James No, the urban centric approach of the strategy needs to exhibit a much stronger balance in favour of the countryside if the delivery, availability and affordability of rural housing is to be tackled in any meaningful way and if the countryside is to survive and prosper. The case for additional rural housing is well documented, for example, the Taylor Report (2008) and most recently in the CPRE report "On Solid Ground" (November 2016): "The rural housing crisis is acute. There is less affordable housing in rural areas than in urban settings; the impact exacerbated by average salaries in rural areas being lower than in urban ones. The shortage of rural affordable housing means many people are forced to move out of their community, to the detriment of local services and the rural communities themselves". 14 Dec 2016 20:57
A. T. Bennett & Sons (Mr. Bennett) • The Strategy is not based upon a robust assessment of sustainable locations and is not seeking to redress the balance of Strategic Housing Locations and employment.

• The opportunity is to direct development to sustainable locations such as locations defined in the JTS as being focused on urban locations, peripheral towns and service villages to the Bristol Fringe. Areas that have already seen the benefit of Employment Area Designations, potential MetroBus improvements, road widening etc.

• The most appropriate Strategy to build on previous successes would include releasing sustainable sites from the Green Belt in locations that improve the performance of settlements.
03 Jan 2017 15:14
A. Williams The Joint Spatial Strategy is a misrepresentation of options available. It makes no mention of the proposed Ashton Vale development which would be, by far, a more suitable reasonable alternative:

• it is situated next to Bristol where most people work and study;
• transport infrastructure is either already in place or has provision made to meet transport needs (it has a new South Bristol link road already built; there would be access to the new Metro Bus service; there is potential for a new train station on the Weston to Bristol line; the planning application includes proposals for a new park and ride and extensive cycle routes into Bristol);
• proposals include a new college, three new primary schools and a new secondary school to support associated population increase;
• proposals include space for GP and dental practices;
• it is at a mature stage of planning and deliverable within the timescales needed. In contrast, North Somerset Council would struggle to deliver 5,400 homes in the Mendip Vale by 2036 (see comments to Question 5) and, in the meantime, the rural towns and villages of North Somerset would remain extremely vulnerable to more piecemeal planning applications and gradual erosion of our social and environmental communities. This could be avoided if the significant number of houses offered by Ashton Vale developers could be delivered much sooner.

I acknowledge that the proposed Ashton Vale site is within current green belt (although we understand this is the subject of a North Somerset Council review committee). However, this particular area of green belt already includes major roads, large areas of land fill, and a golf course; it also comprises just 1.9% of all green belt land in North Somerset. Adjoining green belt also already has Bristol Airport in it. In contrast, Mendip Vale is all green field adjoining the Mendip Hills Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. Mendip Vale offers a superb opportunity to become an alternative designated green belt in synergy with this AONB and, rather than being a site for urbanisation could become designated as green belt to replace the area carved out of existing green belt for the more suitable Ashton Vale solution.

I completely disagree with the proposals for developing a new town in the Mendip Vale as detailed in the Joint Spacial Plan.
10 Jan 2017 09:13
Abbey Manor Group Limited (Jud… it is not clear why some of the locations in Table 2 have been rejected, portishead is an obvious location due to the existing rail link which has been ignored due to the junction capacity on the M5, it may be that the thinking is not radical enough to encourage modal change. 19 Dec 2016 17:59
Adam and Eleanor Cashman The Joint Spatial Strategy is a misrepresentation of options available. It makes no mention of the proposed Ashton Vale development which would be, by far, a more suitable reasonable alternative:

• it is situated next to Bristol where most people work and study;
• transport infrastructure is either already in place or has provision made to meet transport needs (it has a new South Bristol link road already built; there would be access to the new Metro Bus service; there is potential for a new train station on the Weston to Bristol line; the planning application includes proposals for a new park and ride and extensive cycle routes into Bristol);
• proposals include a new college, three new primary schools and a new secondary school to support associated population increase;
• proposals include space for GP and dental practices;
• it is at a mature stage of planning and deliverable within the timescales needed. In contrast, North Somerset Council would struggle to deliver 5,400 homes in the Mendip Vale by 2036 (see comments to Question 5) and, in the meantime, the rural towns and villages of North Somerset would remain extremely vulnerable to more piecemeal planning applications and gradual erosion of our social and environmental communities. This could be avoided if the significant number of houses offered by Ashton Vale developers could be delivered much sooner.

I acknowledge that the proposed Ashton Vale site is within current green belt (although we understand this is the subject of a North Somerset Council review committee). However, this particular area of green belt already includes major roads, large areas of land fill, and a golf course; it also comprises just 1.9% of all green belt land in North Somerset. Adjoining green belt also already has Bristol Airport in it. In contrast, Mendip Vale is all green field adjoining the Mendip Hills Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. Mendip Vale offers a superb opportunity to become an alternative designated green belt in synergy with this AONB and, rather than being a site for urbanisation could become designated as green belt to replace the area carved out of existing green belt for the more suitable Ashton Vale solution.

I completely disagree with the proposals for developing a new town in the Mendip Vale as detailed in the Joint Special Plan
17 Jan 2017 14:33
Adam Silcock This area is one of the narrowest green belt areas in the WOE.
Developing the coalpit Heath/nibley/yate areas would practically join them up. Adding such a number of houses to coalpit Heath isn't in proportion to the size of the area as it is already.
Traffic problems are significantly worse in the coalpit Heath area as badminton road is a major link from the ring road to the yate, chipping sodbury and the Cotswolds. Adding more houses would increase the number of vehicles. Sainsburys was build and has increased the length of time needed to get out onto badminton road so, more houses & cars will make this even worse.
Mine shafts and old mining culverts must be considered as a risk to house building / insurance risks.
Creating 'new towns' with their own drainage, transport links, road systems, schools, shops etc would be a more logical approach rather than expanding existing areas beyond what they can cope with. Lyde green is a good example.
Why are some green belt areas considered to be more valuable to the community than others?? All green belt is there for a reason.
Why is the impact on winterbourne high street greater than that on badminton road?? Both are 30 limits, both link to the ring road. Has anyone experienced badminton road between 7am & 9am?? 4pm & 6pm??
18 Dec 2016 18:41
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