Towards the Emerging Spatial Strategy Document

Table 2: Locations considered and not put forward for inclusion in the emerging spatial strategy

Yatton
Yatton is a very constrained location in terms of transport, flood risk, ecology and transport. The location was tested through the transport modelling and performed poorly as highway trips would have a disproportionate impact on the network as a result of long distances to all destinations and would require expensive mitigation– river and rail crossing. Surrounded by low lying land at risk of flooding.
Long Ashton
The principal area of potential development to the south is separated from Long Ashton by the railway and is difficult to integrate into the existing settlement because of severance issues. It is a sensitive part of the Green Belt valued by the local community. Long Ashton is relatively close to Bristol, so there is an opportunity to maximise cycling and use of metro bus.There are also existing transport constraints relating to congestion at the M5 J19.
Portishead
Portishead is a very constrained location in terms of transport, Green Belt, flooding and ecology. Whilst there is opportunity afforded by Portishead line rail re-opening, there are major capacity constraints at M5 J19.
Easton-in Gordano/Pill
Easton-in-Gordano is a very constrained location in terms of transport, Green Belt, heritage, landscape and ecology. Whilst there is opportunity afforded by the Portishead line rail reopening, there are major capacity constraints at M5 J19.
Clevedon
Clevedon is very constrained in terms of flood risk to the south and east and topography and landscape to the north. The levels landscape is also particularly sensitive both for its own characteristic value and ecological contribution as well as potential for adverse ecological impacts on the coastal habitat to the south of Clevedon. Any new development to the east of M5 would be physically separated from the existing town. Strategic development was also shown to be quite problematic in transport terms in this location with additional trips on the M5 and contributing to congestion on more localised routes.
NW Saltford
This location does not make the threshold for strategic development location. However, it has potential as a non strategic growth location to be explored through the review of the B&NES Core Strategy. The location lies within the Green Belt.
West & South West
Keynsham
This location does not perform well in the Sustainability Appraisal. It would be difficult and costly to mitigate the negative impacts of development in this location. The location lies within the Green Belt.
SE Keynsham
This location does not perform well in the Sustainability Appraisal. It would be difficult and costly to mitigate the negative impacts of development in this location. The location lies within the Green Belt.
SW Saltford
This location does not perform well in the Sustainability Appraisal. It would be difficult and costly to mitigate the negative impacts of development in this location. The location lies within the Green Belt.
Somer Valley
The Somer Valley is one of the least sustainable locations in the sub-region for accommodating strategic housing growth. There is already a substantial imbalance in the number of workers who reside in the town and the employment available and this will be exacerbated in light of
existing residential commitments. It has also proved difficult to attract new employment to the area and jobs have been steadily eroded over recent years. Therefore, strategic new housing growth will inevitably lead to substantial out commuting. Transport modelling shows that seeking to mitigate this will be difficult, costly and only partially effective. The purpose of the new Enterprise Zone is to facilitate employment generation to help mitigate the existing high levels of out-commuting.
Clutton and Temple Cloud
Sites in Clutton & Temple Cloud do not perform well as sustainable locations for accommodating strategic housing growth in the sub-region. The majority of new residents are highly likely to seek to travel by car to work and other activities. Transport modelling shows that seeking to
mitigate this will be difficult, costly and only partially effective.
West of Twerton, Bath
Based on the SA the significance impact that development of this scale and this location would have on World Heritage site and its setting has led to this full site not being considered as a reasonable option. The severity of harm caused by development in this location would
significantly outweigh the benefits. It would cause significant harm to the setting of the WHS and whilst it is not in the AONB, it is on the edge of Bath and is visually prominent, thereby causing harm to the AONB. As such development would contradict national policy. It also performs very strongly in Green Belt terms. Therefore this location is not suitable for development in the plan period.
SE Bristol Hicks Gate
Whilst this location performs well in the Sustainability Appraisal, and would be effective in helping to deliver the Plan’s Strategic Priorities, it lies in a very sensitive part of the Bristol and Bath Green Belt which makes a major contribution to preventing the merger of Bristol and
Keynsham.
Ashton Vale
The Green Belt at Ashton Vale (outside the South Bristol Link) makes a major contribution to Green Belt purposes. It is an area of attractive countryside and a sensitive landscape in relation to, in particular, Ashton Court and Dundry Hill and has ecological importance. It provides the landscape setting to Bristol and for rural communities within North Somerset and plays a significant role in protecting the countryside from encroachment of development. Protecting high quality environment is a priority of the plan. The location was tested through the transport modelling and performed well in terms of potential accessibility by non-car modes given its proximity to Bristol. There are also existing transport constraints relating to M5 J19.
Kingswood/ Warmley
Some 13,500 dwellings remain to be constructed on land allocated in the South Gloucestershire Local Plan & Core Strategy across the Bristol North & North East Fringe communities over the next 10-15 years. Further strategic growth in the locality is likely to undermine delivery
of these key sites. Moreover Bristol has historically predominantly grown north & eastwards. Strategic growth in the locality towards and also up the escarpments would significantly add to the impression of sprawl undermining the objectives of the Greenbelt. Notwithstanding this, significant growth will severely exacerbate congestion and air quality issues along the A420 corridor into Bristol. Road space along the A420 is significantly constrained by the nature of built form limiting the potential for necessary substantive strategic public transport, walking and cycling interventions along it. The locality is also poorly related to major areas of employment. Strategic growth would also further divorce existing communities to the west from physical and visual access to the countryside and potentially impact on Siston Conservation Area, Siston Lane and Webbs Heath areas of landscape value as well as local ecological interests.
Winterbourne and
Frampton Cotterell
Winterbourne, Frampton Cotterell and Coalpit Heath were assessed as a single location. Strategic growth is proposed at Coalpit Heath (see Table 1), however neither Winterbourne or Frampton Cotterell are considered suitable for strategic level growth, due to the likely severe transport impact (on Winterbourne High Street), high landscape value (Frome Valley) and Heritage assets and pylons (west of Winterbourne).
North of M4/M5
Some 13,500 dwellings remain to be constructed on land allocated in the South Gloucestershire Local Plan & Core Strategy across the Bristol North & North East Fringe communities over the next 10-15 years. Further strategic growth in the locality is likely to undermine delivery of  these key sites. Moreover Bristol has historically predominantly grown north & eastwards. Strategic growth in the locality would also therefore significantly add to the impression of sprawl significantly undermining the objectives of the Greenbelt. Notwithstanding this, although the locality is in close proximity to existing strategic employment locations the location lacks good connections. Strategic growth would be severed from the existing urban area by the motorway therefore limiting options in terms of new connections. Strategic growth would therefore have a severe impact on Hortham village and J16 being in such close proximity. Strategic growth would also divorce existing communities from access to the countryside and maturing recreational opportunities, important to support existing residential and employment areas in the north Bristol fringe.
Pucklechurch & M4 to
Shortwood
Some 13,500 dwellings remain to be constructed on land allocated in the South Gloucestershire Local Plan & Core Strategy across the Bristol North & North East Fringe communities over the next 10-15 years. Further strategic growth in the locality is likely to undermine delivery of these key sites. Moreover similar to significant growth at Kingswood/Warmley, strategic growth will severely exacerbate congestion and air quality issues along radial routes into Bristol, where road space is significantly constrained by the nature of built form so limiting the potential
for necessary substantive strategic public transport, walking and cycling interventions. The locality is also less well related to major areas of employment than proposed growth points at Yate & Coalpit Heath. Strategic growth would also further divorce existing communities from
physical and visual access to the countryside and potentially impact on Siston Conservation Area. Development between Pucklechurch and the East Fringe is also highly constrained by its topography, ecological and archaeological interests. Significant development in the locality up these escarpments would thus significantly add to the impression of sprawl and separation in the locality undermining the objectives of the Greenbelt. Pucklechurch itself may have potential for some non-strategic growth to support local services.
Olveston
Olveston is surrounded by high quality landscape, ecological and heritage assets. Access is along ‘lanes’. This village is not considered suitable for strategic level growth but may have potential for some non-strategic growth to support local services.
Wickwar
Major strategic growth is not considered appropriate due to areas of important landscape, heritage and ecological value to the north, northwest and east. The village is also less well related to major areas of employment than proposed growth points at Yate & Coalpit Heath.
Strategic growth would be car based with limited opportunity to improve public transport options, thereby also impacting on other settlements on route to higher order localities and the strategic transport network. However the village may have potential for some non-strategic growth to support local services.
Alveston
Major strategic growth is not considered appropriate due to areas of particular landscape and heritage value to the north, northeast and west. The A38 would sever development to the southeast from the village. Development to the north would also compromise separation from Thornbury undermining green belt objectives. The settlement / locality is therefore not considered suitable for strategic level growth but may have potential for some non-strategic growth to support local services.
Almondsbury
Some 13,500 dwellings also remain to be constructed on land allocated in the South Gloucestershire Local Plan & Core Strategy across the Bristol North & North East Fringe communities over the next 10-15 years. Further strategic growth in the locality is likely to undermine delivery of these key sites. Moreover major strategic growth is not considered appropriate due to the village being constrained by noise, pylons, solar park and proposed air ambulance site to its south / southeast and high landscape value / slopes towards the Severn Vale to its northwest. Similar to land north of M4/M5, strategic growth would also have a severe impact on Hortham village and J16, being in such close proximity. Bristol has also historically predominantly grown north & eastwards. Strategic growth would thus also significantly add to the impression of sprawl in the locality significantly undermining the objectives of the Greenbelt. Therefore, the settlement/locality is not considered suitable for strategic level growth but may have potential for some non-strategic growth to support local services.
Longwell Green
Land at Longwell Green essentially comprises slopes and hilltop with Hanham Abbots Conservation area to the south. This area is an important physical and visual asset with extensive views to and from it to surrounding urban areas. Strategic growth over this area would significantly add to the impression of sprawl undermining objectives of the greenbelt.
Hambrook
Some 13,500 dwellings also remain to be constructed on land allocated in the South Gloucestershire Local Plan & Core Strategy across the Bristol North & North East Fringe communities over the next 10-15 years. Further strategic growth in the locality is likely to undermine delivery of these key sites. Moreover the area is located between the M4 motorway and ring road, severing it from existing communities and suffering from noise and fumes. Hambrook village is also a conservation area with a number of heritage assets. The settlement/locality is therefore not considered suitable for strategic level growth but may have potential for some limited non-strategic growth to support local services.
Bridge Yate / Oldland
Common
The locality is characterised by the escarpment and ridgeline running along its length forming the ‘natural’ edge to the Bristol urban area. A pylon, abattoir and conservation area, archaeological and ecological interests are also present. The escarpments and ridgelines that frame / contain this part of Bristol East Fringe also protect the setting of the AONB. Bristol has also historically predominantly grown north & eastwards. Significant development in the locality up these escarpments would thus significantly add to the impression of sprawl in the locality undermining the objectives of the Greenbelt. Strategic growth would also further divorce existing communities from physical and visual access to the countryside. Therefore, this locality is not considered suitable for strategic level growth but may have potential for some nonstrategic growth to support local services.
Severnside
Comprising Severnside employment areas, Severn Beach, Pilning and Easter Compton. The locality is characterised by the Severn Estuary and the Vale hinterland. With the exception of Easter Compton the locality is predominantly flood zone 3 and provides important habitats for birdlife and other wildlife (designations comprise RAMSAR, SPA, SAC & SSSIs). Strategic pylons and pipelines also intersect the locality. The Severnside 1957/58 employment consent covers much of the area and remains to be completely built out. Therefore, the locality is not considered suitable for strategic level residential growth but may have potential for some limited non-strategic growth to support local services.